AUTHOR:
Dan A.

DATE:
June 23, 2015

CATEGORIES:
On the Job

READING TIME:
2 minutes

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How to Use Your Teaching Degree in Business [Q&A]

AUTHOR:
Dan A.

DATE:
June 23, 2015

CATEGORIES:
On the Job

READING TIME:
2 minutes

About half of college grads never enter the same career as their major, yet potential employees often don’t apply for jobs they’d be great at because it’s not what they majored in. I spoke with one of our Reynolds and Reynolds recruiters, Karli L., about how she put her experience in education to use in a whole new way. Here are her responses and some advice about how you can do the same:

Q: Why did you decide to switch from teaching to the corporate environment?

A: I always thought I wanted to be a teacher; however, I quickly realized the classroom wasn’t where I belonged. Rather than spend years working in an environment that didn’t fit me, I tried to find other opportunities that would utilize the skills I learned as a teacher. I found that job as a recruiter at Reynolds.

Q: What skills are you referring to, and what opportunities did Reynolds give you to use them?

A: Well, there are three main skills I learned through teaching: leadership skills, adaptability, and time management.

One: As a teacher, you need leadership skills to take control of the room and convey a clear message to a large group of people. If someone doesn’t understand, you adapt your explanation enough to ensure everyone has a firm grip on the situation. This translates very well in the business setting when delegating tasks or training new employees.

Two: Being adaptable means you have to think on your feet, articulate the same idea in multiple ways, or change your mind based on new evidence. It’s also a plus if you can control a room and the flow of conversation. Keeping everyone on track is extremely helpful when conducting a meeting, especially one with multiple departments attending or many items on the agenda.

Three: Time management is probably one of the most important traits for a teacher to have. Prioritizing and meeting deadlines also are great skills to have in a business setting.

Q: What advice do you have for people who may be looking for alternative careers in their field of study?

A: Don’t limit yourself. There are a number of job options you might not even realize are in your wheelhouse. Three more skills I learned as a teacher – illustrating ideas, managing projects, supervising individuals – are valuable traits in the business world.

So there you have it! Like Karli, you don’t have to earn a second degree to follow a different path. Find a way to use what you have to start a new, rewarding career. Check out some of our career opportunities to see where you might be able to apply your skills, no matter your background.


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Dan A.

Dan is a Corporate Recruiter in Dayton, Ohio. He studied Organizational Leadership at Wright State University, and is our expert on life at Reynolds and how to make yourself stand out in applications. Dan enjoys participating in a recreational basketball league, following the Bengals and Buckeyes, and playing in the company cornhole league.