AUTHOR:
Austin S.

DATE:
May 10, 2016

CATEGORIES:
On the Job

READING TIME:
2 minutes

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4 Ways to Decode Body Language

AUTHOR:
Austin S.

DATE:
May 10, 2016

CATEGORIES:
On the Job

READING TIME:
2 minutes

Body language is a powerful thing. It can convey what you are thinking in a matter of minutes, without you ever having to speak a word. Being aware of body language is especially useful when you are in an interview. Your interviewer takes notice of how you sit, talk, and look at them. Often, you can pick up cues from your interviewer as well.

To ensure you are sending off the correct body language vibe, try these four simple tricks.

Mirroring

Research has shown that people who act in similar ways develop a higher sense of trust and empathy. When you mirror another person, it makes the other person feel safe and comfortable. If the interviewer moves in toward you, you do the same.

Openness

When interviewing for a position, interviewers will try to determine if you are truthful and open about your answers. Openness can often be figured out through facial expressions, torso placement (directly in front of the interviewer), and your feet placement. Open people tend to move toward the interviewer while closed people seem to turn away.

Power Poses

Power poses do exactly as their name implies: they are poses that showcase the power you have over the room. People who are relaxed typically use a high-power pose while people who are nervous or guarded tend to display a low-power pose.

High-Power Pose:

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Low-Power Pose:

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Check out the difference, especially in a job interview:

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Eye Contact

Eyes are often called “the windows to the soul.” With that being said, what your eyes say is usually what is going on inside of your mind. You should make eye contact when answering an interviewer's questions, but you also should look away from time to time. It's okay to take notes and certainly okay to blink. It's normal.

These four simple tricks can help you decode not only your interviewer's body language, but help improve yours during an interview.


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Austin S.

Austin graduated from Texas A&M with a degree in psychology, and now works as a Corporate Recruiter in College Station. Off the clock, he can be found reading and entertaining family friends with his latest culinary experiments. Austin is the go-to guy for things to do in College Station, and also can help out in the transition from college to a career.