AUTHOR:
DeAnn O.

DATE:
January 23, 2017

CATEGORIES:
Company Culture,
On the Job,
Success from the Start

READING TIME:
2 minutes

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How to Give Your Boss Feedback (and Keep Your Job)

AUTHOR:
DeAnn O.

DATE:
January 23, 2017

CATEGORIES:
Company Culture,
On the Job,
Success from the Start

READING TIME:
2 minutes

Criticizing someone who calls the shots at work can be tricky. How can you be expected to be honest and critical of the person who is in charge of your life at work?

You’re probably thinking—no good can come of this.

However, good things can come from offering feedback (both positive and negative) to your supervisor, if you keep these tips in mind:

  • Stay focused.Just because your boss asked for feedback or you have to submit a formal “reverse review” of her performance, you do not have license to complain, whine, or belittle.
  • Stay professional.A reverse review should be based on critical feedback relating to work projects, relationships, and goals. Seek assistance from the Human Resources department or your department executive regarding personal grievances.
  • Be respectful.Always be respectful because you will be reporting for work in the morning, and more importantly, it is in everyone’s best interest to foster a culture of professional respect. A reverse review process is designed to improve working relationships, not destroy them.
  • Be explicit in your criticisms, feedback, or praise. Yes, a reverse review can also include good comments! Highlight what you think your supervisor is doing well, how he has helped you, and what you have learned by his example. Align your feedback with specific experiences–whether it is a project, a work situation, or a team policy.
  • Be forward thinking.Constructively suggest ways for your supervisor to improve and explain how these suggestions can improve how you perform your job. Illustrate how your feedback can aid your team or department in reaching future goals.
  • This is not a monologue. This is a conversation. Give your boss a chance to digest your feedback and respond. You might not have all the facts or the back-story as to why your supervisor is doing what she’s doing. Her response may alter your perspective.

Remember the relationship between you and your boss is a valuable one, not only in terms of your current job, but also for your future and the overall success of your team. As with any conversation you have with your boss, be thoughtful, prepared, and professional.


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