AUTHOR:
Kate T.

DATE:
May 17, 2016

CATEGORIES:
Success from the Start

READING TIME:
2 minutes

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3 Rules for Sending A Thank You After an Interview

AUTHOR:
Kate T.

DATE:
May 17, 2016

CATEGORIES:
Success from the Start

READING TIME:
2 minutes

It is a best practice to send a thank you after an interview or networking session. But sometimes knowing what to say and how and when to say it can be confusing.

Saying thank you without appearing like you’re begging for a job is often a fine line. To help ensure you don’t cross that line, here are three rules to follow when saying thank you:

  1. Always send a follow-up after meeting with a company representative.

An email or hand-written thank you note is appropriate in this setting.

Often a paper thank you note is more memorable than an email because of the number of emails employees receive on a daily basis. But, if the hiring process is moving quickly, email is the best option. Either way, a thank you note is always appreciated, no matter what form it takes.

An email should be sent 24-48 hours after the interview or meeting.

A hand-written thank you note should be received within three to five business days. Before you leave the office, ask the receptionist for your interviewer’s full name. Or, during the interview ask for a business card. Write your thank you note as soon as possible after your interview and drop it into a mailbox. Remember to use professional stationery with neat penmanship.

No matter which format you choose, personalize the note to what was discussed in the interview or meeting. Create one for each interviewer to acknowledge the time spent with you.

Make notes in your portfolio throughout your interview about points you could refer to as you are writing your thank you note. Whether you say thank you for answering a burning question you had or for taking time out of their day to interview you, there is always something you can be thankful for.

  1. Always send a follow-up if you meet someone at a career fair, networking event, or just for general career advice.

An email or hand-written thank you note is also appropriate in these situations.

It is important to relate your email or hand-written note back to the conversation you had with this particular person. If the person gives you a business card, write down bullet points to use later in your thank you. You can do this after you finish the conversation.

Even if you were just networking or asking for career advice, you never know when a door might be opened and an opportunity arises. A thank you may help bring you to top of mind for an open position.

  1. Proofread, proofread, and proofread again!

Remember, you are attempting to get a position; you need to put your best foot forward. Reading and rereading what you wrote is always a good idea – especially when you are speaking with a potential future employer.

Before you write a paper note, type what you want to say into an application with spell-check. If you are sending an email, send a copy to a friend first to read and edit.

Taking these extra steps will help you avoid looking unprofessional, such as using the wrong form of “there” or “your.” They’ll also help you organize your thoughts so your note is more personal and relevant.

Following these three rules will make it easier to say thank you and help you stand out. You never know, it might just be the thing to land you that job!


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Kate T.

Kate is a graduate of Ohio University, where she studied Communication Studies. She now works as a Corporate Recruiter in Dayton, Ohio. She is an expert on corporate life, as she works with the Reynolds summer internship program and teaches business etiquette courses to college students. After work hours, Kate participates in the cornhole league, finds creative outlets for her DIY skills, and enjoys traveling to new places.