AUTHOR:
Kim C.

DATE:
April 20, 2016

CATEGORIES:
Healthy Life

READING TIME:
2 minutes

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Steady State Cardio and High Intensity Interval Training

AUTHOR:
Kim C.

DATE:
April 20, 2016

CATEGORIES:
Healthy Life

READING TIME:
2 minutes

Since the arrival of spring and warm weather, I have noticed more and more Reynolds associates are taking their workouts outside. In celebration of getting off of the treadmill and on to an actual sidewalk, try mixing up your workout routine with Steady State Cardio and High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT).

Continuous, steady state training and the increasingly popular High Intensity Interval Training provide great benefits and have their place in any exercise routine. Both improve your overall health and fitness level when performed regularly, but utilize different metabolic pathways to produce these improvements.

Training your body to efficiently use more than one metabolic pathway can be very beneficial in improving cardiovascular health and performance. It is recommended nearly everyone should include at least one workout per week involving continuous cardio exercise and one High Intensity Interval Training workout per week.

Steady State Cardio

  • It involves working out at a comfortable pace for an extended period of time (30-60 minutes).
  • The comfortable pace typically is preferred by those who are just starting a cardio exercise routine.
  • It is ideal for those who enjoy socializing during exercise because the lower intensity makes it easier to carry on a conversation.
  • The biggest downside is more time must be devoted in order to achieve all the benefits – at least 30 minutes a day, 3-7 days a week.

High Intensity Interval Training

  • Involves alternating periods of “work,” where you are moving at an intense or fast pace, and “rest,” which may be complete rest or active rest where you are just moving at a slower or less intense pace.
  • This high intensity workout can be intimidating or uncomfortable for some. However “high intensity” is a relative term. When performing a High Intensity Interval Training workout you should work out at whatever high intensity is for you.
  • With High Intensity Interval Training, it is possible to achieve the same benefits of a steady state workout in a shorter amount of time. Typically 20-45 minutes, 2-5 days per week is all you need.
  • Once steady state cardio has become easy for you, it is recommended to add in some High Intensity Interval Training to continue to see improvements in your fitness level.

If you are interested in working harder and getting it done faster, High Intensity Interval Training may be for you. But, it is also good to slow things down now and then. Enjoy a long walk, hike, or bike ride. Mixing things up is good for your mind and body.

Reynolds and Reynolds is committed to wellness as a way to help employees develop healthy habits that help them be more productive and engaged, both professionally and personally. Consult a doctor before starting any diet or fitness regimen.


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Kim C.

Kim works as the Fitness Specialist at Reynolds Headquarters where she helps employees better understand the steps to developing a healthy lifestyle. She graduated from Hope College in Holland, Michigan, with a degree in Exercise Science and is an American Council on Exercise (ACE) certified group instructor and an American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) certified personal trainer. Her passion is running, and she regularly participates in 5k runs in the Dayton area.