AUTHOR:
Abby P.

DATE:
November 10, 2015

CATEGORIES:
Company Culture

READING TIME:
3 minutes

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From Marine Sergeant to IT Director: 4 Tips Anyone Can Use to Succeed

AUTHOR:
Abby P.

DATE:
November 10, 2015

CATEGORIES:
Company Culture

READING TIME:
3 minutes

Clint Cargill Discusses Opportunities for Veterans at Reynolds

Veterans Day is dedicated to honoring those who have served in the U.S. Armed Forces for their patriotism, love of country, and willingness to serve and sacrifice.

At Reynolds, we’re proud of our long-standing tradition of actively recruiting and hiring veterans. And we’ve heard that veterans often find Reynolds’ culture to have similarities with the military: a professional environment built by strong leadership and a strong work ethic.

When Recruit Military asked us to share a veteran’s story in their magazine, Search & Employ, I was privileged to sit down with Clint Cargill, Reynolds IT director and marine sergeant. We discussed his military service, transition to civilian life, and how his career has progressed at Reynolds.

While Clint’s advice was geared toward veterans, what I learned was many of his tips for succeeding in the workplace can apply to all employees.

Pictured: Clint Cargill, director of IT Operations at Reynolds, assists team member Matthew M., also a veteran and Reynolds associate.

Tip #1: Put in the time and effort.

When asked what attitude from the military helped him in the corporate setting, Clint said his “first to arrive, last to leave” mentality.

Instead of focusing on all of the unknowns in his new role at Reynolds, Clint turned to what he did know: He knew how to work hard. He knew how to learn new skills. And, he knew he had the drive to get the job done.

Clint put in the time and effort needed to build his skills and knowledge of the industry. And that’s what’s helped him succeed at Reynolds.

Pictured: Clint visits the Network Operations Center (NOC), part of Reynolds' state-of-the-art data center at Headquarters

Tip #2: Focus on your job.

“My goal was – and continues to be – to do my job well,” Clint said.

“Veterans typically get that every job is important, no matter how seemingly small or insignificant,” he added. “Veterans recognize leadership wouldn’t ask them to do something that wasn’t important.”

It sounds like a no-brainer, but sometimes we get stuck in thinking that our skills should not be wasted on what we perceive as minute tasks. Clint recalled a time in boot camp when soldiers were asked to do peculiar tasks in the mess hall. There, you didn’t ask questions, you just did the job, knowing that it served a purpose. And, sure enough, the drills were to prepare the soldiers for situations in the field.

Remember: It takes all employees doing the best they can at the task in front of them in order to make a company run well.

Pictured: Clint and Reynolds associate Andrew M.

Tip #3: Establish yourself as a “go-to” associate.

I hear that phrase – “go-to” associate – a lot. But, what does it mean?

“You have to consistently perform at a high level to be given more responsibility and earn a promotion,” Cargill said.

Clint described “go-to” associates as those who learn how to be independent, manage stressful situations well, and develop a discipline around participating in training opportunities.

Raise your hand to take on more responsibilities, volunteer for special projects, and mentor new associates. Leadership does take notice!

“I see great people around me getting those opportunities every day,” he added.

Reynolds - Cargill 4

Tip #4: Develop your “soft skills.”

“Over the years, it was not my technical skills that helped me with my career,” Clint said. “That’s not what I leaned on. I relied on my work ethic and professionalism.”

For veterans, it’s important to keep in mind that the leadership skills gained as part of their military service are highly sought-after characteristics in potential employees.

And for job-seekers and employees who do not have a military background, these are lessons we can learn from our military-veteran colleagues.

To all veterans, thank you for your service.

* * *

The full article featuring Reynolds and Clint Cargill is included in the November / December edition of Search & Employ.

For veterans who are interested in learning more about job opportunities at Reynolds, visit: www.reyrey.com/careers/military.asp.


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Abby P.

Internal Communications Lead

Abby graduated from The Ohio State University, where she studied strategic communications and Spanish. She now works as the internal communications lead at Reynolds and she is a specialist in corporate messaging, personal branding and professional development. Outside of the office, Abby enjoys cheering on Buckeyes football, playing in recreational sand volleyball leagues, and spending time with family and friends.